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Worcester People and Places Articles

The Shambles

The Shambles

'Buy!  Buy!  Buy! Saturday night in the Shambles, after 9 o'clock, was like a medieval fair, with butchers vying with each other to auction unsold meat. Until about 1930, a few butchers had any form of refridgeration, and meat was sold off cheaply, rather than let it spoil over the weekend ...


Victoria House and Fashion in 1900

Victoria House and Fashion in 1900

The most famous of Worcester's drapery and millinery establishments in the 19th century was Victoria House. Its premises was part of the old Hop Pole Hotel, one of the most famous posting establishments in the Midlands.


Foregate Street

Foregate Street

From the Town Gate in the Foregate to the Liberty Post at the top of Salt Lane (now Castle Street), was the northern Liberties of the City. The land was outside the walls, but under the control of the City Corporation. Before the Battle of 1651, it was a place of hovels, but in preparation for the attack, these were cleared away. 


Astwood Cemetery - Statistics @ 11th February 2019

Astwood Cemetery - Statistics @ 11th February 2019

The present  official statistics for Astwood Cemetery, @11th February 2019 stands at :

  1. Recorded burials to-date = 79,451
  2. Remainder of burial plots available = 600
  3. Current acreage of land = 85 acres 
  4. There are no plans at present to reuse previously used burial plots
  5. There are no further plans at present for a further Cemetery in Worcester or surrounding area 

 

 

 

 

 


The Worcester White House,  - Held for 12 Pennies and One Red Rose

The Worcester White House, - Held for 12 Pennies and One Red Rose

The Worcester White House, Foregate Street, was until recent times known as the Star Hotel and in the mid - 19th century, the Start and Garter. It shares the distinction of being the oldest County inn with the Lygon Arms of Broadway, for it has had a licence since 1588, the year of the Armada.


More Street Characters

More Street Characters

The Shambles by day attracted the street musicians, if one could generously call them that, for a few could generally play or sing. One played a concertina outside the Butchers Arms (now the site of Marks & Spencers), and his repertoire consists of The Old Rustic Bridge and Abide With Me.


Nash's Almshouses

Nash's Almshouses

Off New Street are Nash's Almshouses, originally intended, like St.Oswald's and Berkeley's for the aged and to be known as Nash's Hospital. It still occupies the original site, and has given the name Nash's Passage to the narrow way by which it was approached. John Nash, in his will dated 1661, 'gave and devised to 16 trustees, property to be held in trust for pious and charitable uses' and with it was bought not only the land upon which the almshouses stand, but five acres of land, the site of the Royal Infirmary. Further almshouses were built on part of that land, which were demolished several years ago at the site of the Cattle Market. The 25 old folk lived rent free, with a small pension, free coal and light, and had other benefits.

 


Alderman John Nash

Alderman John Nash

In New Street there is a fine half-timbered building known as Nash's House. It takes its name from Alderman John Nash, Mayor, and twice representative of the City in Parliament during Charles 1 reign.


St. Andrew's Wesleyan Church, Pump Street

St. Andrew's Wesleyan Church, Pump Street

In 1795, four years after John Wesley's death, the Wesleyan's in the City bought an old chapel in Pump Street belonging to a branch of Independents. It was surrounded by tumbledown houses, and like all the early dissenter's chapels, was tucked away up an alley so not to invite trouble from the mob. 


John Wesley in Worcester

John Wesley in Worcester

The City's first Wesleyan Chapel was built in New Street in 1772, and a plaque on the wall commemorates the building. The first recorded visit of Wesley to the County was in 1761, when he preached in the 'Abbey Church' at Evesham.

 

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New Street Inns and Cock Fighting

New Street Inns and Cock Fighting

Twelve large inns catered for the trade in the Cornmarket in olden times, and four of them were in New Street. They were the Greyhound (later called the Old Greyhound) , the New Greyhound, the Swan, and the Pheasant. The Old Greyhound was the principal place of departure for Carrier carts. No less than nine carts left the Greyhound for outlying places on Saturday afternoons, around 4 o'clock. 


New Street

New Street

Originally, Friar Street and New Street was one street known as Glover Street; there was no break where Charles Street goes to the Blockhouse, Pump Street was a very narrow lane, the bottom of which was known as Vine Street. 


The Blockhouse

The Blockhouse

The Blockhouse was the immediate area outside the City Walls on the east and was part of the Liberties of the City. It was a network of ditches, much like Sedgemoor. Even in the 1850's one remained, with its path along, known as 'Withy Walk', now St Paul's Street. 


Wyatt's Hospital

Wyatt's Hospital

Almost opposite Tudor House is Wyatt's Hospital, founded for six poor men, by Edward Wyatt, Mayor of Worcester in 1696.


Tudor House

Tudor House

Friar Street has retained more of its timber-framed buildings than any other street in Worcester. Many of these houses were of considerable size and were once occupied by citizens of substance, but in the 18th century most of them were divided into tenements and allowed to fall into a sorry state of dilapidation. Many of the brick-faced buildings are in fact, timber-framed behind the facade.


The Greyfriar's School

The Greyfriar's School

Previous to Schaffer's ownership, the prinicipal part of the building was in the occupation of Mr. Christopher Bardin, an old gentleman of venerable aspect, who conducted a private school at modest fees, in the days when public elementary education was in it's infancy.


The Greyfriars

The Greyfriars

The Greyfriars in Friar Street is the finest half-timbered building in the City. The building was only part of the Friary which took in all the ground occupied by the present building a and that of Laslett's Hospital.

 


Friar Street

Friar Street

Friar Street is the most interesting of the medieval streets left in Worcester, and this is due to one man, Mr Matley Moore, who by saving the Greyfriars building, when  the City authorities of the 1930-50 period had 1st the building deteriorate so badly that part of it fell into the street.

 


150th Anniversary Astwood - And the twist to the turn of the tale .........

150th Anniversary Astwood - And the twist to the turn of the tale .........

As we congregated at the grave side of Baby Ryan, it was very peaceful and tranquil with the sun shining through the trees just as Father McGinley started his service, a sound took our attention to look to our left.....

Whilst we all started to arrive at the grave side, a elderly couple stood in the distance, on looking over l could see the lady was very distressed and upset .....


150th Anniversary of Astwood "Graveside Memorial Service Baby Ryan"  9-10-2008

150th Anniversary of Astwood "Graveside Memorial Service Baby Ryan" 9-10-2008

Astwood Cemetery 1858 -2008

Graveside Memorial Service for Baby John Ryan

9th October 2008 3pm

                                                    I am the resurrection and the life, Those who believe in me, even though they die, will live -                       


150th Anniversary of Astwood Baby Grave Marked after 150 Years BBC Ceefax

150th Anniversary of Astwood Baby Grave Marked after 150 Years BBC Ceefax

Ceefax 167 Thursday 9 October 2008 BBC West Midlands


150th Anniversary of Astwood Cemetery The First Burial & Sad Going On's

150th Anniversary of Astwood Cemetery The First Burial & Sad Going On's

Not much is recorded about Bridget (nee Butler) or John Ryan, apart from we know John was a Stonemason's labourer and that they came over from Mayo in Ireland during the Potato famine, sadly Bridget became a Prisoner in Worcester's County Gaol, Whitstones. 


150th Anniversary of Astwood - The End of the Chapels (Transcript Page 19)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - The End of the Chapels (Transcript Page 19)

Unfortunately, through lack of repair by Worcester Council over the years, it was reported in the 1970's that the once so beautiful Chapel required a large amount of work and a considerable amount of money spent to restore them. At this time the Council could not justify spending so a decision was taken to demolish the Chapels which followed in the late 1970's 


150th Anniversary of Astwood - Berrows - Sat 2 Oct 1858 Part 3 - The Collation a t the Guildhall (Transcript of Page 17/18/19)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - Berrows - Sat 2 Oct 1858 Part 3 - The Collation a t the Guildhall (Transcript of Page 17/18/19)

The LORD BISHOP gave the health of the Mayor and Corporation, eulogizing their exertions and again expressing the gratification which he in common with others present bad experience at the day's ceremonial. (Cheers)

(Article Credits: Pam Hinks would like to thank Worcester News formerly Berrow' for permission to reproduce copyright material)


150th Anniversary of Astwood - Berrows - Sat 2 Oct 1858 Part 2 - The Collation at the Guildhall (Transcript of Page 14/15/16)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - Berrows - Sat 2 Oct 1858 Part 2 - The Collation at the Guildhall (Transcript of Page 14/15/16)

A collation was served at the Guildhall at three o'clock to which the Lord Bishop and Mr. Laslett, MP, were invited by the Mayor and Corporation. There were also present most of the members of the Corporation and of the clergy who had taken part in the proceedings of the morning, and a goodly number of ladies. The edibles were provided by Mr. Mountford, with his customary tact.

(Article Credits: Pam Hinks would like to thank Worcester News formerly Berrows for permission to reproduce copyright material)


150th Anniversary of Astwood - Berrows - Sat 2 Oct 1858 Part 1 - Consecration of the Cemetery (Transcript Page 12/13)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - Berrows - Sat 2 Oct 1858 Part 1 - Consecration of the Cemetery (Transcript Page 12/13)

The portion of ground which, through the liberality of Mr. Laslett, MP, and the meritorious exertions of the local Board of Health, has been appropriated for use as a Public Cemetery for the inhabitants of this city, was solemnly set apart for its intended purposes on Tuesday last. The Episcopalian Chapel with its burying ground was consecrated by the Lord Bishop of the Diocese, and that of the Congregational Dissenters of various denominations was solemnly inaugurated.

(Article credits: Pam Hinks would like to thank Worcester News, formerly Berrow's for permission to reproduce copyright material)


150th Anniversary of Astwood - Berrows 18 Sept 1857- Worcester New Cemetery    (Transcript Page 10/11)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - Berrows 18 Sept 1857- Worcester New Cemetery (Transcript Page 10/11)

"The works at the new cemetery are now nearly completed: the consecration of the Episcopalian portion will shortly take place. We have previously briefly noticed them as they progressed, but are now enabled to give more detailed description...

(Article credits: Pam Hinks would like to thank Worcester News formerly Berrow's for permission to reproduce copyright material, It also deserves a mention as to the attention to such splendid detail highlighted in the article by the reporter/editor of the day )


150th Anniversary of Astwood - William Laslett of Abberton Hall (Transcript Page 8/9)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - William Laslett of Abberton Hall (Transcript Page 8/9)

For the establishment of an Orphan Asylum he gave £500 and towards building Holy Trinity Church he gave another £500. He built the grandstand at the Worcester County Cricket Ground and in 1876 funded the Worcester Music Hall upon terms very advantageous to the citizens.. But the gift for which William is most remembered, and which has now been linked together with the rest of his running bequests into Laslett Charities, is the purchase of the old Worcester City prison and it's conversion into Almshouses.


150th Anniversary of Astwood - William Laslett of Abberton Hall (Transcript Page 6/7)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - William Laslett of Abberton Hall (Transcript Page 6/7)

In 1843 Thomas Southall, later Town Clerk of Worcester, was articled to William Years after Thomas could remember how as a young man he was asked to dine with William at Thorngrove, house and furnishings were magnificent, William having brought the contents of the house from the previous owner. (Interestingly this same circumstances appears in East Lynne). The dinner silver and wines were of the very best but two dishes made an indelible impression on the young guest - two suckling pigs, one at each end of the table, one boiled and one roasted.


150th Anniversary of Astwood - William Laslett of Abberton Hall (Transcript Pg 4/5)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - William Laslett of Abberton Hall (Transcript Pg 4/5)

We have a description of Bishop Carr's funeral as it was reported in The Times. As said before he died at 9 pm on Saturday 24 April 1841 but was not buried until 10 am on Monday 3 May 1841. The face that nine days elapsed between death and burial is unusual, that it was a private funeral is most unusual for a Bishop of the Church of England. The Times of Thursday 6 May 1841 says:


150th Anniversary of Astwood - William Laslett of Abberton Hall (Transcript Pg 2/3)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - William Laslett of Abberton Hall (Transcript Pg 2/3)

William Laslett was baptised on 14 October 1799 at All Saints Church, Worcester the first born child of Thomas ans Sophia Laslett. Thomas was a banker whose father had settled in Worcester around 1850. The family were of Kentish yeoman stock originally.


150th Anniversary of Astwood - Forward - ' Our Quiet Citizens of Worcester' (Transcript Pg 1)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - Forward - ' Our Quiet Citizens of Worcester' (Transcript Pg 1)

In recognition of the 150th Anniversary to commemorate the first burial following the gift of land from William Laslett to the inhabitants of Worcester. Tuesday 9th October 2008 3pm Unveiling of Memorial Headstone for Baby Ryan followed by Grave Side Service

 


Public Toilets

Public Toilets

The first public toilet for women in Worcester were erected in land off Little Angel Street


The Cathedral Grates and Lich Street

The Cathedral Grates and Lich Street

The making of College Street through the Cathedral churchyard from High Street to Sidbury in 1792, followed the clearances of houses which had grown up in the shadow of the Cathedral and around St Michael's church. The fine terrace houses in College Yard were also built at that time. In a house on the south side of St. Michael's was born Lord Somers, one of Worcester's greatest sons


The Charlies

The Charlies

As one would expect in the centre of the town, the City had a 'watch' here who had a sentry-type box for shelter in the churchyard of St Nicholas Churchyard. This was before there was any regular police force. They were known as 'Charlie's, and they were usually old men, and a very inefficient body.