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A chronicle of the history of the City of Worcester and the County of Worcestershire

History of Worcester & Worcestershire

Historical Studies Articles

The Beginnings of Worcester

The Beginnings of Worcester

Worcester was the first ford, coming up the Seven, at the head of the tideway which was not unduly affected by the tide, but equally important, there was sharp rising ground which provided a place of comparative safety for those using the ford. This rising ground which Willis Bund called 'the Tump', is that on which the Kings School, Cathedral and the Old Palace now stand.


Old Worcester - Architectural Notes

Old Worcester - Architectural Notes

Until 18c. the carpenter was most important in the buildings of Worcester, but then gave way to the mason and bricklayer, just putting in parts of roof timbers.

The Plague Pit

The Plague Pit

Traditionally, the site of the plague pit was on the old sheepmarket in Angel Street, which originally was an orchard belonging to the Dominican Frairy,

The Bubonic Plague at Worcester

The Bubonic Plague at Worcester

The outbreak of the Bubonic Plague in 1637 was as serious for Worcester as the 1665 Plague was for London. The pestilence swept away at least a fifth of the City's population.

Definitions of History

Definitions of History

'History is then distillation of rumor' Carlyle 'History is philosophy by examble'. Herodotus 'History is just one damn thing after another'. AJP Taylor. 'History gives us a peep into lost ages, and helps us share past deeds with Worcestershire men

Worcester City Regalia

Worcester City Regalia

Before the advent of powder and shot the mace was the yeoman's weapon of attack and defence, It was a heavy-headed club or staff, sometimes studdied with metal, and was the principal weapon of close combat

The Use of Pears in the City and County Arms

The Use of Pears in the City and County Arms

City records going back to between 1460 and 1490 (Ballard's Book) mentions 'six pears sable'. A deed of 1569 bears a seal with three black pears; an Elizabethan grant of 1575 is stated to have been made of the use of three black pears for the City Arms.

The State Sword

The State Sword

The State Sword of Worcester is thirty three and a quarterinches in length, and the cross guard sixteen and a half inches.

The Sword Bearer of the City of Worcester

The Sword Bearer of the City of Worcester

The Sword Bearer, with his magnificent feathered Cap of Maintenance, is a splendid sight in the annual prcession to the Cathedral made by the Mayor and Corporation.

Sir George Vernon

Sir George Vernon

Sir George Vernon, the last of the Vernons of Hanbury Hall, was an unconventional character. He left the Hall and £66,000 to his farm foreman's daughter, Ruth Powick, whom he had taken as his mistress

John Baskerville, Printer and Atheist

John Baskerville, Printer and Atheist

John Baskerville, Printer and Atheist was born at Sion Hill, Wolverly in 1706. He was a confirmed atheist, yet he printed the most beautiful Bibles

Sir John Dineley, 'the Poor Knight of Windsor'

Sir John Dineley, 'the Poor Knight of Windsor'

The baronetcy passed to the Captain's two sons in succession, and did them no good. The elder died insane, and the younger became eccentric,

The Dineley Family and the 'Ruby' Tragedy

The Dineley Family and the 'Ruby' Tragedy

The Dineleys of Peopleton, near Worcester, produced in the 18th century some notable and strange characters. Thomas Dineley, early in the last century, was a traveller and artist.