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A chronicle of the history of the City of Worcester and the County of Worcestershire

History of Worcester & Worcestershire

Articles

St John's Charity School

St John's Charity School

The last of the endowed school's of the City was in 'the township of St. John in Bedwardine', on the west bank of the Severn.It was a combined charity of two ladies who lived in St John's; Milberrow Doelittle in 1719 and Mercy Herbert in 1722.....


The Endowed and Chrity Schools in the City of Worcester

The Endowed and Chrity Schools in the City of Worcester

Worcester has two ancient endowed schools. They were the Cathedral King's School, which was of pre-Reformation foundation and was re-founded in 1541 by Henry VIII, and is still prospering strongly to this day and the Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School. founded in 1561, known as the Worcester Girls Grammar School but sadly closed in more recent times.....


Faith Healer

Faith Healer

Noake tells of an early Victorian faith healer, a labouring man of Stoke Prior, practising the art of healing 'by a charm', cases of thrush in children. He would put his finger into his own mouth and then into the child's, rubbing the gums and mumbling something ending with 'Father, Son and Holy Ghost', then set the child down....


Healing by Charms

Healing by Charms

Belief in charms survived well into the present century, especially for the cure of mysterious troubles that poultices and physic did not seem to touch, such as warts, skin diseases and fits. The charmer blew three times round the head of the patient, made mystic passes with his hands over the part afflicted and repeated an incantation in a low mumbling voice with the express intention that the words should not be understood....


The Village Wise Woman

The Village Wise Woman

Until the coming of the motor-car there were many villages in Worcestershire hidden away among wooded hills where life went on seemingly unchanged, as it had done for centuries. They were insignificant, out-of-the-world little places, inhabited by quaint old-fashioned folk, whose manners and customs were traditional and superstitious........


The King and Queen, and Bambury Stones on Bredon Hill

The King and Queen, and Bambury Stones on Bredon Hill

Long before Christianity, the Celts worshipped at curiously shaped rocks, not in temples, but in the open air, and on hill-tops. These stones were believed to have magical properties, and on Bredon Hill two groups of stones, of great antiquity, were used for religious and super superstitious purposes..........


Folklore in Past Days

Folklore in Past Days

 

                                         

Folklore is the study of beliefs and practices once firmly held. Few now believe in charms, in giants and fairies, but less than a century ago people in lonely places believed in them....

                                                                                               

 


Early Fairground Stalls c.1870

The pictures on this page are among the earliest taken of a fair in the City, and date from around 1870. They are the work of F.C. Earl, who had a studio in Foregate Street........


Strickland's Gallopers

Harry Strickland's grandson, Ray Strickland of Bromyard visited Bill back in 1993, when he saw a article Bill had written in Worc. Evening News, (27.9.1993), Bill recorded the conversation which gave an insight to 


Two Worcester Showman's Roundabouts/Galloping Horses

Two Worcester Showman's roundabouts in Angel Place. Alf Peters stands in front of his Gallopers in Angel Place c.1930, and Stricklands Horse Gallopers in Angel Place c.1920.....


Dr Barnardos & William Gwilliam born 1888

 

It is known that a building on the Shelsley Side of Woodbury Hill existed in the late 19th and early 20th Century's, which was owned by Dr.Barnardo's. originally old maps shown it as the reformatory, ut the locals always spoke of it as 'The Home'.

Bill Gwilliam :

'My father, William Gwilliam lived in what he referred to as 'The Home' for four years. His father had died and his mother was unable to look after him and work. She was employed at Witley Court in the Parish Shrawley, England, as a maid. (although it is in the parish of Great Witley).......   


Captain Michael Clements, R.N

Captain Michael Clements was a naval officer who greatly distinguished himself in the wars with France and Spain. Near Cadiz, in 1778, Captain Clements in the Vengeance, in sight of all the people assembled on the walls of the city, defeated two frigates sent out against him, and took on a whole Spanish fleet, receiving the fire of 24 ships of the enemy, and having 40 holes in the hull, many between wind and water.

 


Nelson at the Hop Pole Inn, Worcester

It was at the Hop Pole that Lord Nelson stayed on his memorable visit to Worcester. The Coming of Nelson had not been anticipated, but during the afternoon of Sunday, 26th of August, 1802, a rumour of his approach spread amongst the citizens, for which mine host of the Hop Pole was probably responsible, for it was there that Nelson had bespoken rooms.....  


An early view of Worcester Cathedral c.1789

An early view of Worcester Cathedral c.1789

An early north east view of Worcester Cathedral c.1789


Huddington Court home of the Wintours and the Gunpowder Plot

Huddington Court home of the Wintours and the Gunpowder Plot

Huddington Court home of the Wintours and the Gunpowder Plot....

 

 

 


Nightwatchman on duty outside St. Helen's Church c.1900

Nightwatchman on duty outside St. Helen's Church c.1900

Nightwatchman on duty outside St.Helen's Church c.1900


Blind Man c.1900

Blind Man c.1900

Blind man reading Braile near the Watergate c.1900


Grimley Lido

In the 1930s a short stretch of river bank at Grimley, known as the Grimley Lido, gave untold pleasure to the people of Worcester. It was hardly a 'Costa Brava' or a beach on the Cornish Riviera, just the length of a longish field, but it became the mecca of thousands of people who wanted a dip in the river, or a picnic, on a summer week-end, or on a Thursday 'half-day closing'...


Terrific troupe which danced for our troops

Worcester Evening News  August 1997

1940's photograph of a popular Worcester wartime dance and cabaret troupe paying tribute to a gifted local dancer who died recently (1997).


Fair Booths on Pitchcroft abt 1880

Fair booths on Pitchcroft about 1880, showing the elaborate painted canvas fronts and small mechanical organ. An original print found in the loft of the British School marked School Photographic Club

 

 


'Uncle' Ben Emblings Sweet Stall c.1909

'Uncle' Ben Embling's Sweet Stall in Angel Street at the Worcester Cheese and Hop Fair 19th September 1909


Angel Street Cheese & Hop Fair 1909

Stalls in Angel Street for the annual Cheese and Hop Fair, 19th September 1909


Worcester Pest House Barbourne

Worcester Pest House Barbourne

Worcester Evening News Remembers Article 13th Feb 1993

Stamping out infection took on drastic proportions at Worcester in 1905 when the city council deliberately devastated an historic house .. by setting it ablaze.....


Robert Whiston and the Worcester King School Endowments

Robert Whiston and the Worcester King School Endowments

Robert Whiston, celebrated headmaster at Rochester and reformer of Cathedral schools, was friend and life-long correspondent of James Knight, the Editor of the Worcester Chronicle. Robert Whiston was headmaster of Rochester Cathedral Grammar School from 1849-1853. He  examined records and found that funds for scholars, and for four scholars at Oxford, were going into the Dean and Chapter's pockets.


The Black Library

The Black Library

Mrs. Sherwood, the writer of children's books, who died at Britannia Square in 1851, was the daughter of the Rev. George Butt, Rector of Stanford and vicar of Clifton-on-Teme from 1771 onwards. When she was only seven years old, an event occurred which left an abiding memory with her. Many years later she described it :-