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Historical Studies Articles

The Holy Well & Comer Gardens

The Holy Well & Comer Gardens

The Holy Well at Henwick was an exceptionally fine spring which in medieval times had been piped to the cathedral and which the prior had used in the baths he had erected for the monks on Holywell Hill (in return for the transference of St. John's tolls to the Worcester bailiff in 1461) The water was credited with possessing curative properties for the eyes, and was extensively used for that purpose. The lead pipes which conveyed the water to the cathedral were pulled up by the Parliamentary troops during the siege of Worcester and used for bullets....... 


Barbourne Terrace

Barbourne Terrace

In the 1850's, Barbourne Terrace was a medley of Georgian villas and gravel pits. In the late 1850's one especially good house was built in Barbourne Terrace for Thomas Chalk by Henry Day. Henry Day loved towers, and this particular building is of ........... 


The Blanquets

The Blanquets

The area west of Bilford Road belonged to the Blanket family until the close of the War of the Roses, when for five generations it was in possession of the Freres. After the late Elizabethan period it was passed through .........


Joseph Berwick & Timberdine

Joseph Berwick & Timberdine

The manor house of Timberdine, a half-timbered building erected by the Mitton's over 300 years ago, lies almost opposite the Ketch Inn. The building today is partially late 19th century, and has been converted into a restaurant.  The ancient priory manor had been a key position at the battle of Worcester, extending from Duck Brook as far as the Ketch Ford....                                                                    


The City Gaol

The City Gaol

The City has had a number of gaols including near the Trinity Gate/Queen Street, first known record is dated 1540, which was one of the smaller gateways within the City wall and had a Gaol Tower, is was a postern gate leading from the City towards....  


The City Walls

The City Walls

It is not known whether the City walls were built on the site of the Anglo-Saxon defences, but the first mention of them is in 1231, when Henry lll allowed the Bailiffs to..


The Worcester City Gates

The Worcester City Gates

None were destroyed or removed after the 1651 battle. Foregate was the first to go in 1702-3. Sidbury Gate in 1768, and St. Martin's in 1787. At or near St. Martin's Gate was a small ..


Old Worcester - Architectural Miscellaneous Information

Old Worcester - Architectural Miscellaneous Information

Until 18c, the carpenter was most important in the building of Worcester, but then gave way to the mason and bricklayer, just putting in parts of roof timbers. The City Corporation helped with grants to rebuild the churches damaged in the Civil War. Worcester became.. 


Worcester College, Oxford

Worcester College, Oxford

In the 13th century the Benedictine Order taxed their foundations in England to establish a college at Oxford. In 1283, John Gifford of Brimsfield made a presentation to the Gloucester community of a site of what is.. 


Worcester Crosses

Worcester Crosses

Walcott's Memorials of Worcester, 1866 records the following:

The High Cross (defiled 1529); The Grass Cross (demolished 1578), The Sanctury Cross in Cathedral Yard, Whitesone Cross and wayside crosses on.. 


Prince Arthur's Tomb

Prince Arthur's Tomb

Prince Arthur was laid to rest on the night of April 26, 1502 in Worcester Cathedral. The legend inscribed on the four sides of his marble-topped tomb in the new Gothic style typeface used by..


The Butts

The Butts

The City authorities were bound by an Act of Henry VIII (33.19) to maintain a place for archery practice, and to train the City levies in the use of the bow. This required a place where the butts could be ...