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A Tribute to Bill Gwilliam MBE

A Tribute to Bill Gwilliam, MBE

Severn Crafts Articles

Tonnage Burdens to Severn Ports

Tonnage Burdens to Severn Ports

The whole navigation extended 160 miles, as far upstream as Pool Quay, Welshpool, Montgomeryshire. Severn ports could be reached by vessels of the following burdens:

Bygone Traffic on the Severn

Bygone Traffic on the Severn

The relative importance of river trade to places on Severn can be roughly gauged by the number of trading vessels which were owned at various places. A list was compiled in May 1756, and published in the Gentleman's Magazine of 1758, xxviii p.277-8

Salt Trows or Wich Barges

Salt Trows or Wich Barges

Between 1860 and the early years of the present century large numbers of new vessels were built for the salt trade. They were known among the Severn trowmen as 'Wich Barges', the name being an abbreviation of Droitwich.

The Severn Trow 'Spry'

The Severn Trow 'Spry'

The 'Spry' was built at Chepstow in 1894 by William Hurd. She was registered at Gloucester as a sloop, Official Number 99538, 36 tons net, 46 tons gross, her managing owner being Mr.Davis, Stone Merchant of Chepstow.

Floods make Severn Unnavigable

Floods make Severn Unnavigable

The Severn is subject to violent changes of level as the flood waters come down from Wales; a rise of 18 ft in 5 hours being known, and heights of 25 ft above average low level is not uncommon, rendering the river unnavigable.

Last Trow under Sail

Last Trow under Sail

The last Trow under sail was the Alma, built in 1854, which traded as a ketch under 1943, while the Palace of 1837 carried stone from Tintern until about 1939

Brindley and Holt Castle Waterwheel

Brindley and Holt Castle Waterwheel

The Navigation Improvement Bill of 1849 mentioned that Brindley had been asked to survey the Severn from Queenhill to Pendock in 1763, but his opinion was never acted upon. Also that Mr. Pickernell, the occupier of Holt Castle, had a waterwheel for supplying

Average Tonnage on Severn, 1849

Average Tonnage on Severn, 1849

The average tonnage passing Newnham (1849) was 363,000 tons, or about 1,000 tons per day. This was exclusive of 205,000 tons that go by way of the Gloucester and Berkeley Canal, part of which is locked into the river again. Ben Devey, of Stourport, a carrier,

The 'Bonavista' of Stourport

The 'Bonavista' of Stourport

The 'Bonavista'  was owned by Captain Hattom of the Angel, who also owned the 'Lady Steamers'. At that time of 1907, she sailed twice daily from Stourport to Holt Fleet after Whit Monday.

The 'Amo' Steamer of Stourport

The 'Amo' Steamer of Stourport

The 'Amo' was the largest pleasure steamer in Stourport. She was built of wood at Windsor in 1892, and rebuilt at Stourport in 1904. Registered at London 1896, No 110195. Length 68 ft 2 ins. Breadth 15 ft 2 ins. Deoth 4ft 5 ins. She was owned (1910-18)