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A Tribute to Bill Gwilliam MBE

A Tribute to Bill Gwilliam, MBE

Places to visit Articles

Greyfriars

Greyfriars

Built in 1480, this timber-framed house is looked after by the National Trust.Open Easter to OctoberWednesday, Thursday & Bank Holidays 2.pm - 5pm


King Charles House

King Charles House

On the corner of the Cornmarket and New Street stood the most important house in this part of the city. Now called King Charles House, it was built by Richard Durant, a wealthy brewer, in 1577 as a two-storey house.

Witley Court

Witley Court

Great Witley, Worcester.A most spectacular country house ruins, step back in time with your own personal audio tour and listen to household memories of "!Upstairs Downstairs life and extravagant...


Harvington Hall

Harvington Hall

Harvington Hall Nr Kidderminster WorcsMedival and Elizabethan Manor House, contains secret hiding places and rare wall paintings.Adimission charges apply


The Elgar Birthplace Museum

The Elgar Birthplace Museum

3 miles West off A44 Leominster Road Tel 01905 333224Open daily 11.00am -1700pm Last admission 4.15. Closed 23rd December to 31st JanuaryA fascinating insight into the life and music, family and...


The Guildhall

The Guildhall

Queen Ann style of architecture, the Guildhall is regarded as one of the finest civic buildings in the county.Monday - Saturday 8.30am - 4.30pm


The Commandery

The Commandery

Dating back to the 1500s, the headquarters of Charles ll prior to the Battle of Worcester, now showing various exhibitions including "Civil War", "The Commandery Chronicle" and "Lives and...


The Cathedral

The Cathedral

Englands most elegant Cathedral, open every day. an ancient crypt and Chapter House, Royal Tombs, medival cloisters, Victorian stained glass,  Services three times daily.Gift Shop, Refreshments,...


Michael Grundy writes:

No-one has done more in a lifetime than H.W ("Bill") Gwilliam to chronicle the history of the City of Worcester and County of Worcestershire. Importantly too, his prolific writings on the Faithful City's past have always been in a most readable, fascinating and absorbing form, full of colour and with a liberal sprinkling of humour.

After retiring from a distinguished career in teaching, Bill researched and compiled volume after typewritten volume on the history of the city and county of Worcester, covering a myriad of subjects such as folklore, pubs, crimes, newspapers, transport. rivers and, above all, "People and Places."

Eighteen years ago, when I began producing weekly features on local history for the Worcester Evening News, I received invaluable help from Bill, and I am sure many other local history researchers down the decades will have had cause to be equally grateful for his ready assistance.

Bill has always shown abounding enthusiasm for the extremely eventful and chequered past of Worcester and the county and has been a veritable font of knowledge on his painstakingly researched subject.

Little wonder that the Queen bestowed the MBE on him for services to the public. I know that the Buckingham Palace Investiture where he received the medal from Her Majesty was probably the most memorable day of his life.

Happily, Bill's vast writings are not being allowed to languish in numerous file folders on shelves around a bedroom at his Worcester home.

Two books of his work have already been published - "Old Worcester: People and Places" and "Worcestershire's Hidden Past" and are available in bookshops, having been produced by Halfshire Books.

I understand too that the Worcestershire Record Office has copied several of his volumes for the county archives, and I heartily applaud Pam Hinks for now so patiently making Bill's researches available to an even wider audience via the Internet.

Mike Grundy, Worcestershire Evening News