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Worcester People and Places Articles

150th Anniversary of Astwood - William Laslett of Abberton Hall (Transcript Pg 4/5)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - William Laslett of Abberton Hall (Transcript Pg 4/5)

We have a description of Bishop Carr's funeral as it was reported in The Times. As said before he died at 9 pm on Saturday 24 April 1841 but was not buried until 10 am on Monday 3 May 1841. The face that nine days elapsed between death and burial is unusual, that it was a private funeral is most unusual for a Bishop of the Church of England. The Times of Thursday 6 May 1841 says:


150th Anniversary of Astwood - William Laslett of Abberton Hall (Transcript Pg 2/3)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - William Laslett of Abberton Hall (Transcript Pg 2/3)

William Laslett was baptised on 14 October 1799 at All Saints Church, Worcester the first born child of Thomas ans Sophia Laslett. Thomas was a banker whose father had settled in Worcester around 1850. The family were of Kentish yeoman stock originally.


150th Anniversary of Astwood - Forward - ' Our Quiet Citizens of Worcester' (Transcript Pg 1)

150th Anniversary of Astwood - Forward - ' Our Quiet Citizens of Worcester' (Transcript Pg 1)

In recognition of the 150th Anniversary to commemorate the first burial following the gift of land from William Laslett to the inhabitants of Worcester. Tuesday 9th October 2008 3pm Unveiling of Memorial Headstone for Baby Ryan followed by Grave Side Service

 


Public Toilets

Public Toilets

The first public toilet for women in Worcester were erected in land off Little Angel Street


The Cathedral Grates and Lich Street

The Cathedral Grates and Lich Street

The making of College Street through the Cathedral churchyard from High Street to Sidbury in 1792, followed the clearances of houses which had grown up in the shadow of the Cathedral and around St Michael's church. The fine terrace houses in College Yard were also built at that time. In a house on the south side of St. Michael's was born Lord Somers, one of Worcester's greatest sons


The Charlies

The Charlies

As one would expect in the centre of the town, the City had a 'watch' here who had a sentry-type box for shelter in the churchyard of St Nicholas Churchyard. This was before there was any regular police force. They were known as 'Charlie's, and they were usually old men, and a very inefficient body.


William Laslett

William Laslett

William Laslett was a notable citizen and a Member of Parliament 


Tudor House

Tudor House

Friar Street has retained more of it's timber-framed buildings than any other street in Worcester. Many of these houses were of considerable size and were once occupied by citizens of substance, but in the 18th century most of them were divided into tenements and allowed to fall into a sorry state of dilapidation


Nelson at Worcester

Nelson at Worcester

It was at the Hop Pole Inn that Nelson stayed on his memorable visit to Worcester. The coming of Nelson had not been anticipated; but during the afternoon of Sunday 26th August, 1802, a rumour of his approach spread amongst the citizens

Wyatt's Hospital

Wyatt's Hospital

Almost opposite Tudor House is Wyatt's Hospital, founded for six poor men, by Edward Wyatt, Mayor of Worcester in 1696. Until a few years ago, it was an attractive row of early 18th century cottages, but has now been mutilated almost beyond recognition.

Tudor House

Tudor House

Friar Street has retained more of its timber-framed building than any other street in Worcester. Many of these houses were of considerable size and were once occupied by citizens of substance, but in the 18th century most of them were divided into tenements

The Greyfriars & Greyfriars School

The Greyfriars & Greyfriars School

The Greyfriars in Friar Street is the finest half-timbered building in the City. The building was only part of the Friary which took in all the ground occupied by the present building and that of

Hannah Snell, The Woman Soldier

Hannah Snell, The Woman Soldier

One of the most celebrated characters of the 18th century was the woman soldier, Hannah Snell, who was born in Friar Street in April, 1723. In some local records, she is said to have

The Guilds

The Guilds

The Clothier's Company of Worcester was in existance in the 13th century, and was subsequently incorporated by Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth. The later charter was dated 23rd

The Eagle Vaults

The Eagle Vaults

On the corner of Pump Street stands the Eagle Vaults, a good example of a 1890 city tavern, with 'art-nouveau' tiles and lettering. Until recently it had the best sand-blasted, decorated windows

John Wesley in Worcester

John Wesley in Worcester

The City's first Wesleyan chapel was built in New Street in 1772, and a plaque on the wall commemorates the building. The first recorded visit of Wesley to the County was in 1761, when he preached in the 'Abbey Church' at Evesham.

New Street Inns and Cockfighting

New Street Inns and Cockfighting

Twelve large inns catered for the trade in the Cornmarket in olden times, and four of them were in New Street. They were the Greyhound (later called the Old Greyhound), the New Greyhound, the Swan, and the Pheasant. The Old Greyhound was the prinicpal place

William Laslett

William Laslett

William Laslett was a notable citizen and a Member of Parliament. He bestowed upon Worcester larger benefactions than any who preceded or have so far followed after him, but he was a man of strange contradictions, who frequently marred his gifts by the manner

The Town Ditch

The Town Ditch

Town Ditch was a characteristic and historic name, as was Watercourse Alley. The former became an important throughfare to Foregate Street, and to satisfy a sentimental objection became Sansome Street. It is a pity the change was made for both were actually